Hypoglycemia in Diabetes – Symptoms, Causes, Risks, Treatment & Prevention

Hypoglycemia in Diabetes Hypoglycemia is a condition in which the sugar level in blood becomes less than 72 mg/dl. Being aware of the early signs of hypoglycemia will allow you to treat your low blood sugar levels better. Hypoglycemia is commonly seen in type 1 diabetes but is also prevalent in type 2 or adult-onset diabetes. Hypoglycemia can be detrimental to the body in many ways; it can even cause neurological damage leading to stroke and coma. Common Symptoms of Hypoglycemia: Fine tremors Excessive sweating Dizziness Palpitations Fatigue Pale skin Confusion Loss of consciousness Coma Risk factors for Hypoglycemia: Low blood sugar can happen to anyone. However, a severe fall in blood sugar can occur in people who are on medications such as Insulin and Sulfonylureas  (such as glibenclamide, gliclazide, glipizide, glimepiride) It is important to know whether your diabetes medication puts you at risk for Hypoglycemia. Talk to you physician to know more about it Causes of Hypoglycemia: Higher than needed dosage of Insulin Large intervals between meals Exercise without eating Alcohol intake Treating Hypoglycemia: A mild case of hypoglycemia can be treated through eating or drinking 15-20g of fast-acting carbohydrates such as glucose tablets, sweets, sugary fizzy drinks or fruit juice. A blood test should be taken after 15-20 minutes to check whether blood glucose levels have recovered. In case of a seizure or a loss of consciousness that persisted for more than 5 minutes, an ambulance might be required an, for example. Preventing Hypoglycemia The key to preventing hypoglycemia is to understand why it occurs and then taking actions to stop it. Testing blood sugar levels regularly can help...

15 Tips to Stay Safe from Dengue Fever

Expert tips to stay guarded this monsoon The onset of dengue has always coincided with the end of the monsoons. This monsoon season more than 100 positive cases of dengue were reported at RxDx. Dengue is a viral infection caused by the bite of an infected female Aedes mosquito. The symptoms of Dengue are usually high fever accompanied by rashes. The best way to prevent dengue virus infection is to take precautions to avoid being bitten by mosquitoes. Below are a few tips that may help reduce your risk of mosquito bites: Turn over empty pails and buckets so that they do not collect excess water. Cover the buckets and drums that are used for storing water. Clean out all empty flower pots. Ensure you do not over water potted plants. Clean and empty water bowls of domestic pets at home and the water bowls of birds in the balcony. Repair broken septic tanks and cover vent pipes with wire mesh if any. Discard the plants that you keep in water at home. Wear clothes that can cover you completely. Wear long-sleeved shirt, long pants and closed-toe shoes instead of sandals. Apply mosquito repellents whenever possible or wear mosquito patches. The mosquitoes that carry the dengue viruses are most active from dawn to dusk; keep windows and doors closed during theses hours. If you have a cooler at home, make sure you clean it regularly. Keep the dustbins clean; do not let any dirt get collected to avoid mosquitoes. Light camphor as it will help in keeping the mosquitoes away. Sleep under a mosquito net. Adult mosquitoes tend to...

Early Signs of Breast Cancer

  As an informed, health-savvy individual, you probably should know what the signs of breast cancer are and what you should look out for, to nip breast cancer in the bud. The most common symptom of breast cancer is a painless lump or mass that has irregular edges. In some cases, it can be tender, soft, rounded and painful too. Paying close attention to any unusual changes that might be occurring, especially within breast tissue is critical to avoid cancer. Below is the list of warning signs of breast cancer Swelling of all or part of a breast (even if no distinct lump is felt) Skin irritation or dimpling Nipple retraction (turning inward) Breast or nipple pain Redness, scaliness, or thickening of the nipple or breast skin Nipple discharge (other than breast milk) Sometimes a breast cancer may spread to lymph nodes around the collarbone or under the arm causing a lump or swelling, even before the original tumor in the breast is detected. Although many of these symptoms can be caused by conditions other than breast cancer, it’s advisable to not overlook them. Everybody is different; know what’s normal for you. For booking, appointment call us today!!! If you have further questions then please contact us on....

Is Red Wine Really Good For You?

Health benefits of red wine have been debated for some time now. Some believe that a glass of wine each day is good for a healthy heart while others think they are overrated. While the internet is flooded with information that claims consumption of a moderate quantity of red wine lowers the risk of several heart diseases, the question that arises is “How much is moderate?”. Let’s know more about what is red wine and how is it made?   Red wine is made by crushing and fermenting dark-colored, whole grapes with alcohol content that ranges from 12–15%. Redwine has a high amount of powerful antioxidants hence consuming moderate amounts of red wine has been shown to have health benefits. Some people believe that red wine is responsible for the good health of the French population and that it is the main explanation for the French paradox. Grapes are a rich source of antioxidants such as catechin, resveratrol,  epicatechin, and proanthocyanidins. Proanthocyanidins reduces oxidative damage in the body and prevents heart disease and cancer. Resveratrol is present in the grape skin which is believed to be very effective in fighting inflammation and blood clotting, as well as reducing the risk of heart disease and cancer. However, the resveratrol content of red wine is rather low. One would have to consume several bottles per day to fetch the benefits and hence is not recommended, for obvious reasons. People who drink approximately 145 ml (5 oz) of red wine twice a week seem to be at about a 32% lower risk than non-drinkers. Drinking small amounts of red wine may reduce...

What is Congenital Heart Disease? How to Diagnose it?

Pediatric Heart Diseases Pediatric heart diseases includes congenital heart disease (present from birth) and Acquired heart disease (Developed after birth). They involve the walls, chambers, valves, arteries and veins of the heart. Congenital Heart Disease Congenital heart disease is the most common birth defect and is an important cause of childhood morbidity and mortality worldwide. Congenital heart disease accounts more deaths in the first year of life than any other condition. Some of these congenital heart diseases present early in life with symptoms like not gaining weight / fast breathing / bluish discoloration, whereas some may not have any symptoms at all and present late in life when any intervention may not be feasible. Acquired Heart Disease Heart disease that develops after birth is described as an acquired heart disease. Common acquired heart diseases include rheumatic heart disease, Kawasaki’s disease, cardiomyopathy and arrhythmias. How do we diagnose heart diseases in children? Careful history taking and a detail clinical examination by a paediatrician / paediatric cardiologist may help suspecting a cardiac problem in a child. Further investigations like Electrocardiogram (ECG), Chest X-ray, and Echocardiogram (ultrasound of the heart) would confirm a heart disease in a child and guide a paediatric cardiologist for further plan. Sometimes, further investigations like Computed Tomography (CT), Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), Holter/Event Monitoring, Stress Test are also needed. Additional care by other specialities like Dietician may be needed in congenital and acquired heart diseases. For booking, appointment call us today!!! If you have further questions then please contact us on....