How oral health can affect your overall health? Find out

We usually think oral health is only about brushing, flossing and getting cavities filled. Most of us do not visit a dentist unless we have pain or bleeding in the mouth. But to our surprise oral health is much more important than just having clean teeth. Our oral health or you can say our mouth offers clues about our overall health. Conditions related to our mouth can affect the health of rest of our body. Let’s make you aware about this – The connection between oral health and overall health: Your mouth contains wide variety of bacteria, most of them are harmless. Body’s natural defense and good oral hygiene can keep a check on these bacteria so that it does not cause any infection. However, in the absence of proper oral hygiene habits like brushing and flossing, bacteria can lead to tooth decay and gum diseases. Certain medicines, like painkillers, decongestants, diuretics and antidepressants can reduce the amount of saliva produced. As saliva helps in keeping the mouth free of food debris and neutralizes acid produced by bacteria, reduction in the amount of saliva can increase the risk for infections. Research has shown that bacteria and inflammation associated with gum diseases may play a role in some diseases. In addition to this, some diseases like diabetes, HIV, cancer can lower the body’s resistance to diseases and infections. What health conditions/ diseases are linked to oral health? Our mouth health can contribute to various health issues including: Cardiovascular diseases: Many studies have proved that infection and inflammation caused by oral bacteria can lead to heart diseases and stroke. Endocarditis: Infection...

A Healthy Smile Can Truly Transform your Visual Appearance

5 Tips to improve your Oral Health   1) Proper Brushing One of the easiest ways to maintain a good oral hygiene is to adopt proper brushing techniques. A continuous back and forth brushing technique does no good and can lead to cervical abrasion of teeth. Cervical abrasion causes enamel to wear off resulting in increased sensitivity. Place the brush at 45-degree angle so that the bristles are partly on the teeth and partly on the gums, now use back-and-forth, up-and-down motion. Make sure it’s done gently in order to avoid bleeding. Brush your tongue and the roof of the mouth gently to remove microbes or any debris that may cause bad breath. Brushing twice in a day is a must; however, if your work or activities prevent you from doing this, thoroughly rinse your mouth with mouthwash or with water post eating. 2) Flossing Flossing removes food debris and prevents plaque buildup while it’s still soft. When debris stays on the tooth surface for a longer time, it forms a thin layer of bacterial bio-film which sticks onto the surface of the teeth. Flossing at night is fine for most people, but if you are prone to gum diseases then it is recommended that you floss in the morning as well. 3) Mouthwash Use of a mouthwash is a must for a complete oral hygiene. A therapeutic mouthwash usually contains special ingredients that strengthen teeth.It helps to treat many oral conditions preventing plaque buildup in between your teeth, on your gums and on the surfaces of the tooth that are difficult to access in normal brushing techniques. Mouthwash also contains fluoride...